Archive for November, 2015

Here’s an example of the way I’m setting my amp lately.  It utilizes what I’ve learned about the Clean circuit, FX Send, Solo, and other things.   (more…)

Advertisements

Tonight, I tried some different setups between my Recto and a Line 6 Pod X3 Live.  I was trying to get a good headphone mix for silent playing.  The “Slave Out” was making noise and I switched to using a send from my Nova System to the X3.  I found the similarities between the modes to be quite minimal.  It was striking, really. (more…)

I already covered the input stage and clean channel.  I’m not going to repeat the information about the input, except for applications to the dirty tones.

The input stage is followed by a coupling cap and a 2.2 M load resistor.  Most amps made prior to the Recto place the grid resistor between the coupling cap and the load.  The load is usually a potentiometer to control gain.  Mesa eschewed this and it’s one of the innovative ideas that distinguishes the amp from others like it.  I can only speculate the exact reason they made this change, but I suspect stability is the main one.  The resistor to ground also gives a path for stray electrons to prevent popping when changing mode relays. (more…)

This is in regards to the Presence circuits for a 3 Channel Dual/Triple Rectifier and the Roadster/Road King.  I do not have information on the Reborn or miniature versions, though I suspect they kept it pretty much the same.

Mesa came up with a clever Presence circuit for the 2001 3 Channel Rectos, which carried over to the Road King and Roadster on their relative channels.  For the sake of flexibility, the Presence pot is flanked by relays to swap the function between modes.  The modes are used to determine power amp response due to negative feedback and the amount of distortion it is capable of producing.  From most to least: Modern, Vintage, and then Raw.

Using Modern, the negative feedback is disconnected and treble frequencies are being attenuated by an RC filter connected between the the Presence pot and the wiper of the Treble pot.  Using Vintage, negative feedback is being fed from the transformer to the PI.  The amount of feedback is controlled by the Presence pot, which also sets the frequency cutoff; it has dual functions as a resistor divider and a filter.   Raw is a special case and is discussed on its own below.  I will be using Channel 2 for the examples, but I will contrast the circuit differences with channel 3. (more…)

Since I’ve been utilizing the FX Send function for tone, I wanted to add it to the form I use for settings.  Here’s a copy for you.
Dual Rectifier Settings

Edit: Since writing this post, I’ve found increasing the Send to be more effective when the bias is colder.  Tubes in the lower range will make the amp run warmer and improves the sound without adjusting the Send.

In the manual, Mesa recommends bypassing the loop to get the best tone for recording or other situations where the fidelity is needed (isn’t that always?).  The loop works by cutting down the signal to send it out (like a volume control) and then re-amplifying it when it comes back in through the Return.  This is great for inserting effects, but people often struggle with the tone, because it’s always going through those amplification stages when engaged.  I found an effective way to get a better sound with the FX loop engaged. (more…)