Archive for the ‘Ideas To Be Developed’ Category

Update: This is the final version of the DR Booster:

Dr Booster final

The R10 is actually a pot, not a resistor.  With R10 at 10k, the boost is 19.1 dB; At 0 it is 3.5 dB.  The frequency band is 33 Hz – 2.9 kHz, with 330 Hz as the center. (more…)

The McBooster

Posted: June 29, 2016 in DIY, Effects, Ideas To Be Developed

I breadboarded a simple and basic booster which began as a MXR Microamp clone.  I was looking for something to push the amp into a certain sweet spot and the Microamp wasn’t quite right.  I thought it was too farty, frizzy, and prone to clipping for what I wanted.  I changed many of the part values, moved the pot to the feedback loop, and adjusted frequencies a couple of times to have a wide-band-pass filter which increasingly loses treble as the gain is increased.  The gain of the booster is also decreased to 8 (18 dB), versus a gain of 20 (26 dB).  This is to prevent clipping the op amp to an extreme with modern humbuckers.  If a person is using vintage pickups, the values can be changed to get greater gain, but it isn’t really necessary.  I used it with my humbuckers in pseudo-single coil, parallel wiring and it made them pop right out, adding clarity and girth. (more…)

This week, I’ve come across two great sources of information, ideas, and inspiration: (more…)

Looking at the cover, I noticed that La-te-ra-lus has an alternate meaning (at least in-part).  La, Te, and Ra are notes in the Solfege sight reading method.   (more…)

Sabbatical

Posted: March 23, 2016 in Ideas To Be Developed

I have been very ill for a couple of years.  It impacts my cognition as much as it impacts my physical abilities.  I have to take some time off from blogging to rest and to attend to pressing matters, as my life is full of doctors, lawyers, and other expensive people. (more…)

The purpose of the article about changing the anode resistor value was to improve the clean channel and smooth the dirty channels.  That is exactly what it will do, but I wanted to talk about conceptual ideas regarding this change.  I’m going to use pedals for illustration and then translate that over to tube amplifiers.

Analogy

I used to build guitar pedals and I’ve spent a lot of time cascading circuits into each other.  While transistors and op amps react differently than tubes, the overall result on dynamics is similar from one component to another. (more…)

GE7signalflow

Basics of the Signal Path

The input to the Boss GE-7 Graphic EQ has a buffer which is active at all times.  There is a slight emphasis around 2 kHz to help the guitar sound stand out.  Immediately after the buffer is the amplifier for the level control.  It’s a differential type with only one source voltage split with the level’s sliding potentiometer.  This slider will either boost or cut the whole signal when it is moved from the zero line.  From here, the signal is split; one path goes to the EQ section and one part goes to the positive input of another differential amp.  The EQ section feeds the negative input of the differential amp. (more…)

I put together a rudimentary representation of the effect on filter curves when setting a graphic EQ.  It isn’t exact.  Use it to get a general idea for the way a graphic EQ shapes the signal. (more…)

Blank Settings Form For Boss GE-7

Using an equalizer to boost the guitar’s input signal makes a lot of sense.  It provides a clean gain and a lot of headroom.  Aside from boosting the signal, it can, of course, be used to carve out specific frequencies.  Unlike most overdrive pedals, an equalizer has the ability to be very precise with multiple frequency bands and can create special effects.

The downside to this specific pedal is noise.  It uses cheap tantalum capacitors in the signal path.  This creates a hissing sound when the sliders are moved away from the zero mark.  The MXR 10 Band EQ is reputedly better, but I don’t own it and can’t comment about it further. (more…)

I previously wrote about my trials of playing guitar while dealing with a serious illness.  With my 25.5″ scale length, LTD guitar, I’ve now found a medium point of balance.  When I am able to play, the guitar nearly plays itself.

After more than a decade of doing my own setups, I’d stopped measuring them and would do it mostly by feel.  I did it that way for years.  For the problems I have now, I need to be able to easily adjust anything if the guitar shifts from temperature or humidity changes.

At the time of the previous article, I had been thinking in very abstract terms regarding tension and height; trying to imagine the physics at work.  What I’ve ultimately found is that I’d made the height so low and relief so flat, the neck did begin to backbow and warp.  I corrected the truss rod, increased the tuning, and set the guitar aside to settle in.  When I came back to it, it got a setup similar to the factory specs and then some adjustments were made. (more…)