Posts Tagged ‘Settings’

I don’t have time to type right now, but here are the images from the analysis for a 2 Channel Orange, 3 Channel Vintage on ch 2, and 3 Channel Vintage on ch 3.  The responses of the 2 Channel Orange and 3 Channel Vintage on ch 2 are very close.  Other factors could influence the differences between them.

2ch voicingandpresencevintageorange

2 Ch Orange

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The idea was to take Vintage on Channel 2 and make it sound very similar to Modern on Channel 3.  The results ended up being very close, but I didn’t have the time to completely match the EQ (for the most anal of comparisons).  The overall response was what I was going for and that is achieved.  (more…)

HarmonicI like this boosted filter.  The 400 Hz peak is accompanied by a 3.2 kHz peak of a smaller amplitude.  This accents the 4th Harmonic, which is consonant.   (more…)

GE7signalflow

Basics of the Signal Path

The input to the Boss GE-7 Graphic EQ has a buffer which is active at all times.  There is a slight emphasis around 2 kHz to help the guitar sound stand out.  Immediately after the buffer is the amplifier for the level control.  It’s a differential type with only one source voltage split with the level’s sliding potentiometer.  This slider will either boost or cut the whole signal when it is moved from the zero line.  From here, the signal is split; one path goes to the EQ section and one part goes to the positive input of another differential amp.  The EQ section feeds the negative input of the differential amp. (more…)

I put together a rudimentary representation of the effect on filter curves when setting a graphic EQ.  It isn’t exact.  Use it to get a general idea for the way a graphic EQ shapes the signal. (more…)

(Edit: I confused some 6L6 sub-types in the original article, which I don’t think is hard to do).

I ran across this article about Sovteks and how the rating charts for several tube brands compare.  I am needing tube replacements and this seems pretty handy for finding tubes that fall into Mesa’s bias range for their 6L6GC.

I’ve been using Ruby 6L6GCMSTR, which is an excellent tube, and I will likely stick with it, but these others have piqued my interest in differences between the sub-types. (more…)

Fuzz-Crunch-CleanI’ve been experimenting with making Channel 3 a fuzz tone for a long time, but recently got just the setting I wanted.  This kind of setting gets close to “Dazed And Confused” and sounds good with “Purple Haze”.  Being tube, instead of transistor, it’s a little softer, but the Presence  can dial in the edge a person needs for fuzz bliss.

Faux-Fuzz EQ Setting

Yellow is the Modern setting as described above with no treble and full mids. Green reduces Bass to 11:00.

The way that old, germanium transistor fuzzes would clip is awfully close to the way the cold clipping circuit works in these Marshall/Soldano types of circuits and the Recto has the bottom end to really sound huge.

I found this Channel 2 Raw setting to be a match for the fuzz tone.  It’s bright, with plenty of bottom, and crunches up quite nicely.  Both dirty channels get cleaner as guitar volume is rolled back, but, like a Tonebender, Channel 3 never gets “squeaky clean”, but it does make a nice half-clean sound, since the treble is flattened.

I hope this helps.  Enjoy.

June 2016- I realize the flow of this article could use some work.  I have plans to reorganize it at another time.  

We’ve looked at the input and Clean, the Mode voicing and Gain control, V2 and V3EQ and modes and Presence.  I am going to bring it all together and take a less detailed, wider, view of the system as a whole.  I’m concentrating on Channels 2 and 3, since they are the primary identity; the “Recto” sound.

Additionally, I’m going to cover a little bit about the power amp, even though I have not concentrated on it in my writing this year.  I think the intention of Mesa when designing it is misunderstood.

I’m going to be making certain assumptions based on the overall design and historical precedents in guitar amplifiers and Mesa designs.  I could be wrong, but I am presenting it the way I best understand it, based on how everything interacts, and considering the differences between this amp and others much like it.  Mesa tends to tune their amps by ear, so some of the effects from changes may be unintentional or accidental.  That doesn’t negate the actual effects from being valid points innovation on the design.

For filter analysis, I’m using the Okawa website.

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Here’s an example of the way I’m setting my amp lately.  It utilizes what I’ve learned about the Clean circuit, FX Send, Solo, and other things.   (more…)

Since I’ve been utilizing the FX Send function for tone, I wanted to add it to the form I use for settings.  Here’s a copy for you.
Dual Rectifier Settings