Posts Tagged ‘tube’

In some of the articles, I made statements regarding a possibility of mild power amp drive, because I had not had time to really dig into the power amp to confirm or deny it, and due to the sound of Modern mode.  The power amp does not overdrive.  If you come across anything relating to this, any descriptions should be discarded if they contradict the following paragraphs.

Modern has some distortion present, but it isn’t clipping distortion; It’s regular ol’ harmonic distortion, which is otherwise known as “the tube sound”.  I don’t have time or energy to get into it, but the power amp is designed to stay as clean as possible, but tubes do not always amplify in a “linear” way.  This adds curvature to the sound waves, distorting them by bending (coloring the sound). (more…)

On the back of every Mesa Engineering Dual Rectifier, there are 2 switches to select options for the power supply.  One of these is to select Bold and Spongy and affect overall voltage to the amplifier, with Bold being full power and Spongy reducing power by about 20%.  The other switch is used to select the rectification: Silicon or Tube.  Selecting Tube reduces power by nearly 10%, since the tube has losses when it conducts.  There are 4 options for running the power supply:

  • Bold and Silicon
  • Bold and Tube
  • Spongy and Silicon
  • Spongy and Tube

Before I get to decisions for selecting power supply options, we should cover some facts and history.  Along the way, we’ll learn basic information about the differences between these options. (more…)

We’ve looked at the input and Clean, the voicing and Gain control, and V2.  Now, it is time to examine V3, the coupled cathode follower.  I urge you to read about cathode followers if you do not understand how they work and wish to learn more.

The biggest things for a novice to know are:

  • A cathode follower is usually used to lower impedance to drive a tone stack or an effects loop.
  •  The cathode of the second tube follows the voltage on its grid closely (hence “cathode follower”).
  • The first tube provides amplification of the signal and stability to the cathode follower.
  • When coupled (wired together), the two tubes act like one (mostly). (more…)
  1. Input Stage
  2. Stage 2: Go With The Flow
  3. Stage 3: Clean It Up
  4. Skip The Nerd Talk: Putting It All Together
Introduction

I’ve been thinking a lot of about modifications recently and I’ve been going over the schematic for the 3 Channel Dual Rectifier on a regular basis for quite awhile.  I was recently thinking back to when I was starting out and how it was difficult to understand why or what a part of the amp was doing.  I don’t consider myself an expert.  I was taught solid state theories in school and had to buy books and read websites regarding tubes and how they apply to guitar amps.  I wished there was more information about the design concepts.  So, I thought I’d break down the preamp for the Dual Rectifier into the stage circuits and just talk about the general, overall concept of what each does on its own and together with its neighbors.  This might help the users with tones and circuit designers and hobbyists with ideas and insight. (more…)

 

Raw as a Marshall-y

Jimmy Page-inspired settings.

 

(Updated 12/26/15: Second example added)

These are settings I use for classic rock.  The Presence and Treble should complement the other by having one to the lower setting if one is higher, though your mileage may vary.   (more…)

90s Heavy

The Clean is about what I use normally with the tube rectifier and sounds good with the other settings.  The Soundgarden setting in Channel 2 is based on Fell On Black Days (turn your guitar volume down) and Let Me Drown.  It’s more of a setting for Cornell, since he did the rhythm on his songs and Outshined sounds pretty good on it, too.  Channel 3 sounds pretty close to Tool’s Stinkfist, H, 46+2, and Third Eye.  All the channels compliment each other pretty well and would work as a basis for finding a personal tone.

Let me know what you think of this.