I don’t have time to type right now, but here are the images from the analysis for a 2 Channel Orange, 3 Channel Vintage on ch 2, and 3 Channel Vintage on ch 3.  The responses of the 2 Channel Orange and 3 Channel Vintage on ch 2 are very close.  Other factors could influence the differences between them.

2ch voicingandpresencevintageorange

2 Ch Orange

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I very quickly drew the negative feedback filter controlled by the presence control when using Vintage mode on a 2001 3 Channel Dual Rectifier.  The red line represents the -3 dB half boost mark from the point of the most filtering.  I tried drawing the entire phase inverter, but it didn’t make a difference on the plots, so I removed it and kept it simple.

R2 is being instructed to act as a variable resistor with 11 points to represent each 30 degrees of travel from 0 -10 on the control.  Anytime a part of the plot goes below the red line, the feedback is lessened by quite a bit and those frequencies pass the phase inverter more easily.  The maroon line on each picture is representing the control being at maximum and a massive amount of the frequency band is passing easily. Read the rest of this entry »

Update: This is the final version of the DR Booster:

Dr Booster final

The R10 is actually a pot, not a resistor.  With R10 at 10k, the boost is 19.1 dB; At 0 it is 3.5 dB.  The frequency band is 33 Hz – 2.9 kHz, with 330 Hz as the center. Read the rest of this entry »

The McBooster

Posted: June 29, 2016 in DIY, Effects, Ideas To Be Developed

I breadboarded a simple and basic booster which began as a MXR Microamp clone.  I was looking for something to push the amp into a certain sweet spot and the Microamp wasn’t quite right.  I thought it was too farty, frizzy, and prone to clipping for what I wanted.  I changed many of the part values, moved the pot to the feedback loop, and adjusted frequencies a couple of times to have a wide-band-pass filter which increasingly loses treble as the gain is increased.  The gain of the booster is also decreased to 8 (18 dB), versus a gain of 20 (26 dB).  This is to prevent clipping the op amp to an extreme with modern humbuckers.  If a person is using vintage pickups, the values can be changed to get greater gain, but it isn’t really necessary.  I used it with my humbuckers in pseudo-single coil, parallel wiring and it made them pop right out, adding clarity and girth. Read the rest of this entry »

In some of the articles, I made statements regarding a possibility of mild power amp drive, because I had not had time to really dig into the power amp to confirm or deny it, and due to the sound of Modern mode.  The power amp does not overdrive.  If you come across anything relating to this, any descriptions should be discarded if they contradict the following paragraphs.

Modern has some distortion present, but it isn’t clipping distortion; It’s regular ol’ harmonic distortion, which is otherwise known as “the tube sound”.  I don’t have time or energy to get into it, but the power amp is designed to stay as clean as possible, but tubes do not always amplify in a “linear” way.  This adds curvature to the sound waves, distorting them by bending (coloring the sound). Read the rest of this entry »

The idea was to take Vintage on Channel 2 and make it sound very similar to Modern on Channel 3.  The results ended up being very close, but I didn’t have the time to completely match the EQ (for the most anal of comparisons).  The overall response was what I was going for and that is achieved.  Read the rest of this entry »

The younger version of me was very much into hard rock, alt-rock, and metal.  The types of amps and guitars I used all went to 11 and stayed there.  As I got older, I branched off into other directions.  In my mid-20s, I ditched electric altogether and played acoustic for 4 or 5 years, only to return to it with a Big Muff.  In my early-30s I explored more classic rock, but with modern tones.  Now, in my late-30s, I’ve gone from being an acrobatic, outside soloing, masturbator to being limited in my playing and learning about economy of notes and action. Read the rest of this entry »

This week, I’ve come across two great sources of information, ideas, and inspiration: Read the rest of this entry »

I have a LTD AX-2E, which was a model available for only one year.  Despite the funky body shape, it’s a beautiful guitar and the U shaped neck profile is nice.  The jumbo fret size makes the strings appear to stand at a gargantuan height from the ebony fretboard, but the point of tall frets is to enable very little pressure to fret a note.  It’s almost a scalloped sort of feel.  Kung-Fu action grip will make notes sharp. Read the rest of this entry »

HarmonicI like this boosted filter.  The 400 Hz peak is accompanied by a 3.2 kHz peak of a smaller amplitude.  This accents the 4th Harmonic, which is consonant.   Read the rest of this entry »